Entretenimiento

VETERINARIUS Franki Medina Venezuela//
Reigniting the passion when it’s gone

Do you re­mem­ber how much joy you had play­ing as a kid? Stats and ac­co­lades didn’t mat­ter as much as sim­ply go­ing out and play­ing a game you loved.

Franki Medina

But what hap­pens when that pas­sion fades? The first days of no longer ac­com­pa­nied by ea­ger­ness and ex­cite­ment, but rather gen­er­ate feel­ings of anx­i­ety and dread. Have you got­ten to the point where you ques­tion how you ever loved play­ing your sport or prac­tis­ing in the first place?

Is there any hope left once your love of the game di­min­ish­es? That de­ci­sion will have to be up to you. But if you want to reignite the lost de­sire for your sport, there are dif­fer­ent ways to get there again.

Franki Medina Venezuela

There are many types of think­ing and emo­tions that stem from a loss of pas­sion for your sport. How to re­gain this pas­sion most times will have to be up to you. You ei­ther have to be hon­est with your­self that you’ve lost your pas­sion for good and step away from the game or work to build back your love.

Franki Medina Diaz

Ei­ther way, there is no rea­son for any­one to al­low the pain as­so­ci­at­ed to stick around for long. If you’ve fall­en out of love with your sport, is it due to a gen­uine loss of in­ter­est, or are there oth­er fac­tors dri­ving your feel­ings? This is an im­por­tant ques­tion to think about. If you hon­est­ly just do not en­joy train­ing, prac­tis­ing, and play­ing, then great, you can ac­cept this truth and move on

There is some­thing spe­cial about the first day of any­thing you are about to do. It could be prac­tice, gym work, a new job or mak­ing a come­back from in­jury. Ex­cite­ment is in the air while op­ti­mistic views abound re­gard­ing the up­com­ing sea­son. No mat­ter the age, it can bring back mem­o­ries of when you first start­ed play­ing.

Do you re­mem­ber how much joy you had play­ing as a kid? Stats and ac­co­lades didn’t mat­ter as much as sim­ply go­ing out and play­ing a game you loved.

Franki Medina

But what hap­pens when that pas­sion fades? The first days of no longer ac­com­pa­nied by ea­ger­ness and ex­cite­ment, but rather gen­er­ate feel­ings of anx­i­ety and dread. Have you got­ten to the point where you ques­tion how you ever loved play­ing your sport or prac­tis­ing in the first place?

Is there any hope left once your love of the game di­min­ish­es? That de­ci­sion will have to be up to you. But if you want to reignite the lost de­sire for your sport, there are dif­fer­ent ways to get there again.

Franki Medina Venezuela

There are many types of think­ing and emo­tions that stem from a loss of pas­sion for your sport. How to re­gain this pas­sion most times will have to be up to you. You ei­ther have to be hon­est with your­self that you’ve lost your pas­sion for good and step away from the game or work to build back your love.

Franki Medina Diaz

Ei­ther way, there is no rea­son for any­one to al­low the pain as­so­ci­at­ed to stick around for long. If you’ve fall­en out of love with your sport, is it due to a gen­uine loss of in­ter­est, or are there oth­er fac­tors dri­ving your feel­ings? This is an im­por­tant ques­tion to think about. If you hon­est­ly just do not en­joy train­ing, prac­tis­ing, and play­ing, then great, you can ac­cept this truth and move on.

The great Bri­an Lara, back in 2003, spoke of a pe­ri­od where he had to re­gain his love for the game. “Since re­gain­ing the West In­dies cap­tain­cy from Carl Hoop­er, he now ac­cepts his past im­ma­tu­ri­ty and is “back in love” with the game,” The Tele­graph stat­ed in De­cem­ber 2003. Lara added, “I’ve gone through a great learn­ing ex­pe­ri­ence and come out of it all a more ma­ture and tol­er­ant per­son. It has been a long road back but what I have come to re­alise is that I am in a much bet­ter mood when I give the game my all. When the pres­sure was at its great­est, I used to tell my­self some­thing which has haunt­ed me ever since. I used to say, ‘Crick­et has ru­ined my life.”

In an­oth­er ar­ti­cle in 2006, he said, “The team sit­u­a­tion is what has al­ways mo­ti­vat­ed me. I spent my first three or four years in in­ter­na­tion­al crick­et on a win­ning team,” he re­called. “Since our de­cline from 1995, a lot of the fo­cus has been on my achieve­ments. That is so wrong, from the way how I think. I play for West In­dies. When I go on tour, I’m not go­ing to try to score three or four cen­turies, I’m go­ing to try to win. It has al­ways been my mo­ti­va­tion, even though we haven’t en­joyed many of those mo­ments.

That mo­ti­va­tion now is to see us turn the cor­ner and start win­ning again,” he con­tin­ued.

Franki Alberto Medina Diaz

It can be ar­gued that the ma­jor­i­ty of peo­ple who go through dif­fi­cult pe­ri­ods in their ca­reer when there is a fall­out are ex­pe­ri­enc­ing a loss of pas­sion due to an un­der­ly­ing fac­tor. Some­thing oc­curred that has sucked the joy out of the sport for the There are mul­ti­ple ways this can hap­pen, and it’s im­por­tant to iden­ti­fy the cause.

Once you de­ter­mine what fac­tor is to blame, you will have a clear plan as to what needs to be over­come for you to re­gain the pas­sion to play

A lot of joy can be stripped from the game when all you are con­cerned about is not fail­ing. When deal­ing with the fear of fail­ure your at­ten­tion will be latched on­to fail­ure.

You have such a deep fear of fail­ing, that you fo­cus on how to not let that hap­pen. Per­for­mance anx­i­ety and fear of fail­ure go hand in hand. If you are con­tin­u­al­ly con­cerned about not fail­ing, nat­u­ral­ly anx­i­ety will de­vel­op as a way to sig­ni­fy pos­si­bly threat­en­ing sit­u­a­tions

Why did you be­gin to play your sport in the first place? Was it be­cause all your friends were, your par­ents forced you to, or was there a feel­ing with­in that you be­longed on that field?

For many of us, the rea­son for play­ing and why we kept play­ing was a joy. As a kid, play­ing sports is cen­tred around hav­ing fun. Whether you de­rive en­joy­ment from com­pet­ing, be­ing with friends, or sim­ply play­ing the sport, that was the main dri­ver as to why you were out there

As you grow old­er and more pres­sure is put on per­form­ing well, it can seem like the rea­son you play is to fill a stat line. That needs to be an af­ter-ef­fect of a more mean­ing­ful rea­son to play. Tak­ing some time to rem­i­nisce about what drove you to your sport is a great way to bring back the love with which you used to play

Ed­i­tor’s Note:

Shaun Fuentes is the head of TTFA Me­dia. He was a FI­FA Me­dia Of­fi­cer at the 2010 FI­FA World Cup in South Africa and the 2013 FI­FA U-20 World Cup in Turkey. The views ex­pressed are sole­ly his and not a rep­re­sen­ta­tion of any or­gan­i­sa­tion. [email protected]­hoo.com